Principle 5 & 6

I'm again and again amazed at peoples stories. Heather says it so well: "I love people... I just love them". Talking with them you find out the joys and the struggles they have. Breaking bread really is meant to be done together. 

In his book, How to Win Friends & Influence People, Dale Carnegie writes in a few principles how to make friends and suggests to come to Dutch Delicious to take some real bread to break with people. No, actually he doesn't. He does, however, give some key elements to make relationships a grand experience for all involved. 

Principle 5: Talk in terms of the other persons interest.

When you really connect with a person, Dale goes on to describe that a moistening of the eyes will occur. When you are really interested in the other person, and take all the principles to heart you will notice that you really connect as individuals. 

Principle 6: Make the other person feel important - and do it sincerely.

In the beginning of the book Dale states that every single person is only interested in themselves. People then often listen to respond instead of listening to understand. So to help you while 'breaking bread together' ask yourself the question, "What is there about the other person that I can honestly admire?" On the next page of this fantastic book he writes about connecting with people just to show kindness without expecting anything in return.

Hoping it will make a difference in your next interaction, as it has in mine. Next time you see me I'd love to hear what amazing stories you have heard and learned. 

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For me relationships are one of the reasons I love times in front of the bakery. Yes, right on the side walk. Here I meet the customers, and ... on a crisp summer morning, "where His mercies are new", the first bread is just in the oven and a hot cup of D.E. is on my lap - its the time to break bread with the team of blue checkered pants bakers.

"That is a feeling that flows and sings in your memory long after the incident is past." Carnegie

"That is a feeling that flows and sings in your memory long after the incident is past." Carnegie